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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
H. R. Keller.  The Reader’s Digest of Books.
 
The Morals
Seneca (c. 4 B.C.–65 A.D.)
 
Morals of Lucius Annæus Seneca, The (Philosophica), is the general title given to twelve essays on ethical subjects attributed to the great Roman Stoic. They are the most interesting and valuable of his numerous works. Representing the thought of his whole life, the most famous are the essays on ‘Consolation,’ addressed to his mother, when he was in exile at Corsica; on ‘Providence,’ “a golden book,” as it is called by Lipsius, the German critic; and on ‘The Happy Life.’ The Stoic doctrines of calmness, forbearance, and strict virtue and justice, receive here their loftiest statement. The popularity of these ‘Morals’ with both pagan and Christian readers led to their preservation in almost a perfect condition. To the student of Christianity in its relations with paganism, no other classic writer yields in interest to this “divine pagan,” as Lactantius, the early church father and poet, calls him. The most striking parallels to the formularies of the Christian writers, notably St. Paul, are to be found in his later works, especially those on ‘The Happy Life’ and on ‘The Conferring of Benefits.’  1
 
 
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