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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
H. R. Keller.  The Reader’s Digest of Books.
 
The Doll’s House
Henrik Ibsen (1828–1906)
 
Doll’s House, The, one of the best-known plays of Henrik Ibsen, was published in 1879. It is the drama of the Woman, the product of man’s fostering care through centuries,—his doll, from whom nature has kindly removed the unused faculties which produce clear thinking and business-like action. Nora, the particular doll in question, adorns a little home with her pretty dresses, her pretty manner, her sweet, childish ignorance. She must bring up her babies, love her husband, and have well-cooked dinners. For the sake of this husband, she ventures once beyond the limit of the nest. He is ill, and she forges her rich father’s name to obtain money to send him abroad. The disclosure of her guilt, the guilt of a baby, a doll who did not know better, brings her face to face with the realities of the world and of life. The puppet becomes vitalized, changed into a suffering woman who realizes that there is “something wrong” in the state of women as wives. She leaves her husband’s house, “a moth flying towards a star.” She will not return until she is different, or marriage is different, or—she knows not what. ‘The Doll’s House’ is the most striking embodiment in the range of modern drama, of the second awakening of Eve. The last scene of the play is given in the LIBRARY.  1
 
 
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