1. As stated in the text for much of the early history of Nevada it was never considered as a

700 WordsApr 23, 20193 Pages
1. As stated in the text for much of the early history of Nevada it was never considered as a place for settlement but instead used for quicker and easier trails to California or trapping expeditions. The Mexican-American war, the movement of the Mormons into the West, and the search for mineral wealth all indirectly ended up leading to the settlement of the territory. Initially Nevada was a territory of Mexico that they had gained after achieving independence from the Spanish in the early 19th century. Unfortunately for Mexico, as the 19th Century progressed the idea of Manifest Destiny, which stated that Americans had not only the right but the responsibility to encompass all territory from the Atlantic to the Pacific, became more…show more content…
This meant that more and more trading posts and later permanent settlements were required to assist travelers on their way. One of the first of these was a temporary station in the Carson Valley called Mormon Station, which eventually became a permanent settlement known as Genoa. More and more of these began popping up along the base of the Sierra Mountains and more non-Mormons began settling the area. The combination of these three events that did not seem to directly affect the settlement of the territory directly all combined to become the beginnings of the State of Nevada. 2. Although attempting to become a separate territory from Utah since 1851 Nevada did not become its own territory until after the election of Abraham Lincoln and the resulting secession of Southern States in 1861 two days before Lincoln was to take office. Nevada was only its own territory for a year before there was a vote to decide if the citizens wished to apply for statehood. The vote was overwhelming with more then 81 percent of the vote going towards becoming a state. Unfortunately, the process of writing and ratifying a constitution for the territory was very unpopular. The issue of mining taxes and state official elections inextricably linked to ratification led to disputes and eventually rejection of the constitution in 1863 by nearly 80 percent of voters. The national issues arising from the Civil War, however, helped to push Nevada

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