10 Days That Unexpectedly Changed America Research Paper

2482 Words Sep 9th, 2012 10 Pages
The ten dates that were selected by the History Channel while consulting a group of distinguished historians each triggered a series of events that shaped and molded America. Though they all have an enormous impact on American history, culture, and legacy many other dates not mentioned also produced extreme changes throughout America’s history.
January 24, 1848: Gold Rush: Eliminated
The California gold rush drastically changed America in numerous ways. It facilitated economic growth and prosperity in the west. In addition, it “inspired perhaps the largest mass movement of people in world history. ‘Neither the Crusades nor Alexander’s expeditions to India (all things considered) can equal this emigration to California,’ wrote one
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On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to surrender her bus seat to a white person. Rosa Parks is quoted as saying, "I thought about Emmett Till, and I could not go back. My legs and feet were not hurting, that is a stereotype. I paid the same fare as others, and I felt violated." Her act of civil disobedience led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the emergence of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as a powerful leader in the fight for civil rights, all powerful symbols of the civil rights movement. (Crowe, n.d.)
September 9, 1956: When America Was Rocked (by Elvis): Eliminated
Ellvis Presly was the “white man with the Negro sound and the Negro feel” that Sam Phillips was looking for. Elvis, using the modern TV and radio to spread his music, became a figure head for the rebellious new teenagers of the mid-twentieth century. His image was of a sexy rebel who challenged the sexual and social conventions of the times instigating much social change. (Gillon, n.d.) While Elvis did have a devastating impact on the culture of America so, too, did the Harlem Renaissance, which made it possible for Elvis to sing the type of songs he did by setting the stage not just in music, but in many other areas of American culture.
February 12, 1909: The Founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
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