17th Amendment Impact on the United States

2316 Words Apr 20th, 2014 10 Pages
Over 100 years ago a sweeping reform changed America. The progressive movement. In the early 1900s this progressive reform redefined more than a century of American tradition. William Schambra and Thomas West noted that. “the Progressives, wanted the people 's will to be more efficiently translated into government policy. . . . that the people would take power out of the hands of locally elected officials . . . and place it instead into the hands of the central government.” This sounds great, but we all know. It didn 't work. This progressive reform gave us instead the Federal Behemoth as it is today. During the progressive movement things were passed like Federal Income Tax and the complete government control on the US dollar by the …show more content…
He served as a political appointee, the Deputy Assistant U.S. Attorney General in the Office of Legal Counsel, Department of Justice, during the George W. Bush administration.
October 22, 2010 12:10 PM http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/250726/repeal-17th-amendment-john-yoo The Federal Senate was designed to protect the people, through the state government, US Politics About.com says this...
“In the Senate, the states are represented equally, two Senators per state. In the House, the states are represented proportionally, based on population. This plan for representation is known as the "Great Compromise" and was a sticking point at the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. The tension stemmed from the fact that states are not created equal in size or population. In effect, the Senate represents the states and the House represents the people.”
US Politics.About
US SENATE: ORGANIZATION
Kathy Gill
(Kathy 's formal education is in journalism, a field that produces policy analysts both inside and outside of government. She holds a bachelor of arts degree in journalism from the University of Georgia and a master of science degree in agricultural economics from Virginia Tech. In the 1980s, Kathy was a participant in and board member of Pennsylvania Rural Leadership (RULE), a Kellogg-funded leadership development program designed to foster civic understanding and involvement)
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