3.3 Explain the Social and Medical Models of Disability and the Impact of Each on Practice.

998 Words Aug 7th, 2012 4 Pages
Social models and medical models of disability
By labelling a child because of there disability can prevent us as seeing the child as a whole person like their gender, culture and social background the medical models is a traditional view of disability and that through medical intervention the person can be cured where in fact in most cases there is no cure. They expect disabled people to change to fit into society.
The social model of disability looks at ways to address issues to enable people to achieve their potential, by looking at ways to adapt the environment so the child can feel included this is very important. The social model has been constructed by disabled people and by listening to what disabled people want and to remove any
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The Medical Model regards disability as an individual problem. It promotes a traditional view of disability, that it is something to be ‘cured’, even though many conditions have no cure. The problem is seen as the disabled person and their impairment, not society, and the solution is seen as adapting the disabled person to fit the non-disabled world, often through medical intervention. Control resides firmly with professionals; choices for the individual are limited to the options provided and approved by the 'helping' expert.
When medical labels are placed on the disabled person (for example, referring to people with epilepsy as ‘epileptic’), the individual is seen merely as their impairment. Such labels can prevent us from developing a picture of the whole person, including their gender, ethnicity and culture, and social background.
The Medical Model is best summarised by referring to the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps developed by the World Health Organisation in 1980. The classification makes the following distinctions:
Impairment is ‘any loss or abnormality of psychological, physiological or anatomical structure or function’.
Disability is…