A Brief Note On Alternative Dispute Resolution And Other Forms Of Helping Professions

1462 WordsNov 23, 20156 Pages
Alternative Dispute Resolution Conflict resolution is used in various aspects of counseling and other forms of helping professions. It is vital that conflicts between opposing parties are managed in order for progress to be achieved. By maintaining a controlled environment during the negotiation process, the two parties will often be able to come to a resolution of their differences. Sometimes it can be difficult for two parties to work together without the help of a third party to assist in the process. This person can work as a mediator or arbitrator between the parties, able to make suggestions throughout the negotiation, and or make a decision for the parties (Barsky 2000). These are forms of alternative dispute resolutions that are…show more content…
1 Kings 3:16-18 tells the story of King Solomon using a form of arbitration to settle a dispute between two women who were in disagreement about who was the mother of a baby they brought to the king. In I Corinthians 6:3-6, Paul recommends mediation or arbitration to be employed to settle civil disputes between Christians instead of taking their problems to court and bringing disgrace upon the church. In colonial North America, a group of respected men from the community would hear disputes and decide on a resolution. It was used occasionally for some years after afterwards, but was not until 1898 that Congress gave official authorization for mediation to be used in formal disputes. In the early 1900s, the Federal Arbitration Act was passed, which furthered the capabilities of arbitration to be used in conflict resolution and for its results to be upheld in court. The American Arbitration Association was founded in 1926 to assist in guiding parties working through arbitrators. The Age Discrimination Act of 1975 brought forth claims of discrimination in workplaces, which were often mediated by the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. After the 1980s, many schools began to offer courses related to alternative dispute resolution, and now some type of alternative dispute resolution is integrated into the majority of law school programs
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