A Brief Note On The Battle Of Antietam

1367 WordsAug 3, 20156 Pages
The Battle of Antietam started the morning of September 17, 1862 at 0600. Union troops of the First and Twelfth Corps made their way across Antietam Creek the day before in efforts to attack the left flank. From 0600 to 1000, the Union troops were with Confederates under Major General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. This engagement occurred in a 24-acre cornfield. These were the most deadly hours of the battle; over 8,000 casualties were killed at this time. As Union General Joseph Hooker later wrote, 'It was never my fortune to witness a bloody, dismal battlefield in that nature. ' In the first hour of the battle in the Cornfield, the slaughter was so intense that one man fell, was killed or wounded every second. By 10 am, Union troops…show more content…
By 1 pm, Federal forces had taken the road, breaching a hole in the Confederate lines. However, because of fatigue and serious casualties, these Union troops were not able to proceed any further. By the early afternoon hours of September 17, about 17,000 Union and Confederate soldiers had fallen as casualties at Antietam. Midday page: 5 The battle moved south into a section of the line known as the Sunken Road because of a major terrain feature. At about mid morning the fight was expected to take place from 9:30 AM and last until 1:00 PM. The Confederates in the middle of the battlefield, led by General D.H. Hill, were in a sunken road that they were told to hold at any price. Colonel John B. Gordon said to General Lee “these men are going to stay here, general, till the sun goes down or victory is won.” They shot from the sunken road at the approaching Northern generals French and Richardson’s soldiers of General Sumner’s corp. The union line retreated 5 times, but kept returning. For some unexplained reasoning, the right of the Confederate boundary ultimately stammered and subsided. Union General Richardson exploited this convenience and went in the Confederate right. He attacked through the sunken
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