A Brief Note On The State Of Oklahoma

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Oklahoma is currently in the middle of a drought but many people argue that we actually have a water surplus in the state. Estimates place over 300 million acres of groundwater underneath the state. Oklahoma also has more man-made lakes than any other states in the U.S. The problem here is similar to the one the entire World faces, the water isn’t located where we need it. The majority of the state’s agriculture is in the western, central, and southern portions of the state while South-eastern Oklahoma has the majority of the State’s surface water. When you start to call that water a “surplus” you start to bring in other parties wanting to purchase the water. The significance of the location of all of this water is extremely crucial in…show more content…
Army Corps of Engineer in the late 70’s in a joint effort with the State of Oklahoma in order to provide growing cities a future source of water. The State was unable to recover the costs of the projects and eventually stopped paying the federal government. Oklahoma City stepped in a few years ago and paid off the State’s debt to acquire 90% of the water rights. Oklahoma City is definitely doing the smart thing when it comes to looking for new water sources to supply a growing population. I really think that they should think about this source long and hard before they begin to use it. I remember when the Army Corps of Engineers released 30,000 acre-feet of water from Canton Lake last year. It dropped the lake level tremendously and that town, the lake, and businesses that depend on summer traffic still have not recovered. This is exactly the type of thing residents in the Sardis Reservoir watershed are afraid of, they know that OKC can have water released whenever they need it, and they don’t have to ask the people and businesses in the area for permission. Sardis Lake is a hotspot for fishing, and recreation activities that many residents depend on to make a living. If the lake levels drop tourists will just go to a different lake, is that what the locals are supposed to do as well? The Kiamichi River is also an ecological hotspot, and without a steady dam release downstream the lower Kiamichi River will continue to suffer even
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