A Closer Look at Sam Monroe

1001 WordsOct 14, 20105 Pages
At a first glance, Sam Monroe is a character who one could easily assume is a very angst-filled, lonely, and misunderstood teenager. This being said, it is no secret that Sam is quite troubled, in fact his appearance and moodiness are a clear cry for help and attention and could be signs of severe depression. His cry goes unanswered as his family is too busy and selfish to be bothered with his needs, turning him into an equally selfish person. Sam takes out his frustration by doing drugs, as seen in his first scene in Life as a House. He dresses in very attention grabbing ways, with very dark clothing, eye makeup, and facial piercings, yet still goes ignored. He spends most days alone in his room blaring his music and hiding away,…show more content…
First, he stops wearing eye makeup, then takes his facial piercings out, and stops wearing the mostly black wardrobe he'd become so accustomed to. We then begin to see Sam's personality change. He enjoys spending time with others now, and is more outgoing and helpful. The signs of depression even become minimal. But when George finally reveals to his son that he is dying of cancer, Sam tries to alienate him again, only for a moment, thinking his father has selfishly tricked him into repairing their relationship, rather than just trying to show him the love he needed all along. In the end of the movie, we see the greatest sign of change in Sam Monroe. His father left him the house they built together, which Sam did not originally want, and rather than selling it, Sam gave it to someone he knew his father would have approved of: a disabled woman who was the victim of a crash, caused by George's father driving while intoxicated. Life as a House is not just about one man and his battle of cancer. It is about family, and the interconnected stories of a father and son. The impact that one person can have on another, and the ability for an individual to change for the better because of a positive influence in their life. Sam Monroe went from a horribly depressed, reckless, attention seeking, anti-social adolescent who was selling his body for drug money, to a caring, loving son with a sense of purpose. Sam shows us that divorce can have a major
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