A Comparative Analysis of Different Passages

5926 WordsMar 10, 200724 Pages
Charlotte Brontë 's outcry might seem exaggerated to us, but Victorian novels and paintings mostly do not picture the position of a governess in a positive way. Even if it might seem unusual, as the governess is a servant, a mere shade in the house of a family, she has yet caught the attention of artists. Maybe it is precisely her inconspicuous but obstinate presence that attracts the attention. Although she has an acknowledged status, she does not completely fit in her environment. She is different from other servants concerning social rank and education, and though belonging to the same social class (sometimes even belonging to a higher social level, being an aristocrat working in the house of a "bourgeois") as the family, she has to…show more content…
In fact, she seems to be an idealized image of how a governess should be and be treated. From the beginning on, she is presented as a "member of the family" , and "the air of habitual authority with which she looked about her, spoke well for her position in Mr. Vanstone 's family. This was evidently not one of the forlorn, persecuted, pitiably dependent order of governesses. Here was a woman who lived on ascertained and honorable terms with her employers--a woman who looked capable of sending any parents in England to the right-about, if they failed to rate her at her proper value." Even though the Vanstone daughters have grown out of the age that needs a governess, Miss Garth stays in the family, as she has a firm place in its affection ("But Miss Garth had lived too long and too intimately under Mr. Vanstone 's roof to be parted with for any purely formal considerations; and the first hint at going away which she had thought it her duty to drop was dismissed with such affectionate warmth of protest that she never repeated it again, except in jest." ) For the two girls she is a second motherly figure, and becomes the only one when their mother dies. She brings comfort to the Vanstone daugthers, she remains a refuge to the
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