A Comparison of Leadership Abilities of Odysseus in Odyssey and Aeneas in Aeneid

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Comparing the Leadership Abilities of Odysseus in Odyssey and Aeneas in Aeneid

These two heroes have embarked from the same destination but on very different journeys. Whilst they are both Iliadic heroes at the start of their stories, they develop and adapt their manner towards the characteristics required of them to succeed. Before we judge them, it is necessary to determine our definition of a successful leader. A hero from the Iliad must be "a speaker of words and one who is accomplished in action", according to the horseman Phoinix (Iliad.9.413). A leader must have these primary qualities then, as he must lead by example, but to create the ideal we must add to this. The leader should rely on no others but in turn listen to
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When he lands at Carthage and Venus is kind enough to give him information about Dido's people, she is disguised and departs immediately after having spoken, to the despair of Aeneas ("you so often mock your own son...you too are cruel" A.1.406). The other help he receives is limited ("thick mist" A.1.411) and with no knowledge of its existence. Whilst his mother is vehement in defending her son and his people when she is on Olympus ("it is unspeakable. We are betrayed" A.1.252 "take pity on them" A.10.60), no action is taken to ease him in his distress or console him in person. Within the Aeneid, the gods are not the ever-present guardians that Athene is to Odysseus in the Odyssey, whether they agree or not ("Hercules checked the great groan... helpless tears streamed" A.10.465). Athene on the other hand, not only helps Odysseus with her divine power but she gives him advice ("go to the swineherd" O.13.403), disguises him ("change you beyond recognition" O.13.396), and even cares for his family ("instil more spirit into Odysseus' son" O.1.89, "prompted the wise Penelope" O.21.1). She is very intimate with Odysseus, conversing at length and speaking very openly ("you are so persuasive, so quick-witted, so self-possessed" O.13.333). Whilst Venus never alights on the earth to console Aeneas in his grief ("heart sick at the sadness of war" A.8.29), Athene can not bear to leave her hero
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