A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen

834 WordsFeb 19, 20183 Pages
Mr. Krogstad, a former employee of Torvald is the leading antagonist in A Doll House. He clearly has an agenda and a lust for power. Krogstad’s lust for power gives the reader a sense of subtle rage because Krogstad only wants what’s best for him and his family but he exploits Nora for his own gain. Krogstad advances the plot by controlling Nora through a loan, while illuminating both main characters, and reinforcing the themes of confusion and lost love. Krogstad influences the plot in a very influential way from the very beginning when Nora and Krogstad both meet. He tries to use Nora as a puppet in order to save his job at the bank, Krogstad asks Nora to “influence on my behalf (837).” He is clearly trying to persuade Nora in order to keep his “subordinate position in the bank (837).” Nora then tries to play this down by informing Krogstad that she has no influence and that no one is trying to take his position at the bank. Krogstad lashes out at Nora in order to order to get a reaction. To understand this aggression the reader needs to understand male psychology. “According to the recalibrational theory of anger, anger is an adaptation designed by natural selection to regulate conflicts of interest.” (Physical Strength). Krogstad’s anger lead him to the decision to lash out at Nora because Krogstad believed that Nora had the power to control Torvald. Krogstad’s anger influenced Nora because Nora was frightened of Krogstad. The reader eventually finds out why. “I’m not

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