A Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, By William Wordsworth And On First Looking Into Chapman 's Homer

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Sublime, as the keyword that guides the two major poems, “Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” by William Wordsworth and “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” by John Keats, has helped both authors to express their genuine feelings. The word “sublime” is used when you have a great respect and a sense of excellence for something; “Of such excellence”, the feeling of awesome. The feeling awesome has a root word of “awe”, which means the feeling of respect for fear or wonder. The word can also be used to describe the deeper understanding of beauty, beyond human understanding. Both “Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” and “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”, depict different aspects of sublimity. In “Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey”, it often relates sublimity with Nature; On the other hand, “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”, the author of the poem demonstrates how Keats feels sublime on while reading the English translation by Chapman of Homer’s poem. As demonstrated in the poem of “Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” by William Wordsworth, he often relates sublimity with Nature. The title: “Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” implies the author was writing his poem at the River Wye, which is located at “a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey”, England. Given that he was composing the poem at the river, which is part of nature; we can interpret that majority of what he was expressing in the poem, is within the

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