A Jury Of Her Peers By Susan Glaspell Analysis

1089 Words5 Pages
In the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, many married women felt a sense of hopelessness in their lives. In a time of our history when women were restricted in many ways, one might assume marriage would be a place of comfort for women, a place of relative equality. However, as many of the women writers of this period illustrate, marriage might leave women feeling caged, trapped, and desperate. Two great examples of this are Kate Chopin’s short story “The Story of an Hour,” and Susan Glaspell’s short story “A Jury of Her Peers.” From the very beginning of “The Story of an Hour,” the audience is able to infer the kind of marriage Brently and Louise Mallard have. Mrs. Mallard seemed to have loved her husband because of the…show more content…
Wright was very well fed up with being treated as a lesser human being than her husband Mr. Wright. She wanted to be able to have her own rights and do what she wanted to do not what her husband wanted her to do. Mrs. Wright also felt as if she were being trapped inside her house and wasn’t allowed to go anywhere just like Mrs. Mallard had felt. Mrs. Wright makes it obvious that she is a very strong, brave and independent woman. She was tired of being portrayed as not equal to her husband so she took matters into her own hands and killed him. Some visitors came to her house and asked if Mr. Wright was home and she simply said, “yes he’s home,” but when they asked to see him she said, “no cause he’s dead” (Glaspell 541). “He died of a rope around his neck,” said Mrs. Wright (Glaspell 541). When asked who had killed Mr. Wright all Mrs. Wright could say was “I don’t know” (Glaspell 541). At this point in the story, it is very obvious that Mrs. Wright murdered her husband in his sleep by tying a rope around his neck. With her actions not only does this show how much braver she was than Mrs. Mallard in “The Story of an Hour,” but also what she was willing to do in order to be able to gain her own freedom and…show more content…
However, because they were women they couldn’t write letters to the paper to be published in order to let everyone know what was going on and how they were being treated at home. Kate Chopin and Susan Glaspell looked past all that when writing these short stories. They had the voice and the proof to show what was happening and they were going to be heard. These two ladies wanted to let all the other married women in the nineteenth century know that they were not alone because every married lady was going through the same thing. All women wanted was to be treated equal, have their own freedom, and be given the great love and support that husbands now days give. Marriage in the nineteenth century was almost like slavery. The men were so heavily dependent on the women to manage all the housework while also taking care of the kids
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