A Lean & Hungry Look Analysis

1690 Words Dec 1st, 2010 7 Pages
“That Lean and Hungry Look” – Suzanne Britt Jordan Julius Caesar stated “Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look, he thinks too much; such men are dangerous.” Cassius’ “lean and hungry look” unsettled Julius Caesar, who preferred the company of fat, contented men whom he believed were more trustworthy and appreciative. When we think of heavier people, we think that they are nice because they have nothing to be mean about and typical thin people will be stuck up and rude to the heavier person because they do not see that heavier person for who he really is. This is a stereotype; heavier people are not necessarily jolly, and thin people are not necessarily mean or stuck up. Stereotypical attributes have had a negative effect on society, …show more content…
They believe in “goofing off” because the day is too long in their opinion. Jordan also compares the mental attributes of heavy and thin when she talks about happiness; in “That Lean and Hungry Look”, the thin person portrays a bothersome trait, believing logic and 2,000-point plans lead to happiness, while the fat person is already aware that happiness is indefinable. Jordan uses these kinds of comparisons and contrast between fat and thin in the article to demonstrate the advantages of being fat that are not seen by most people, for they are under the impression that fat is always unattractive or unhappy. Thirdly, Jordan article is filled with connotations. This successfully confirms Jordan’s argument that being fat is “better” than being thin. Jordan’s connotations become obvious with her use of the word “fat.” She made the word sound acceptable, usually–no, quite always–the word fat has had a negative connotation, but she was able to use it and make it feel positive and, even a little bit, righteous. When Jordan says things like, “Fat people have room. Fat people will take you in” it makes the audience root for the fat person rather than the thin person, because the fat person seems more approachable, which supports Jordan’s main argument. Another effective connotation used by Jordan would have to be her use of the word “thin.” In this article,
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