A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare

1100 Words Jan 26th, 2018 4 Pages
Shakespeare paints Midsummer’s scenes into an imbalance of what’s real and fiction, dark or light. The play’s structure allows the audience to ask questions about the nature of Shakespeare’s society and of love itself. The tradesmen’s play-within-a-play functions as a developing comic relief between the main story line, as well as a look inside the society in the world of Shakespeare, theatricality and a reflective parody of the confusion and imbalance in each setting. In Act 1, Scene 2, the tradesmen of Athens gather to begin working on the play they want to prepare for the Theseus’ wedding in comical and satirical fashion. First, the group begins assigning roles, which brings out each character’s own personalities for the audience to see. Bottom, whose name fits his acting ability stature, pegs himself as the opposite; an amazing actor who will bring the audience to tears, yet he and the group are all completely amateur to everyone but themselves. This imbalance notes an important social theme in the play; that the lower class tradesmen firmly believe the play will be professional with their abilities, yet the audience cannot take them seriously, causing their meeting to be a comical display to the otherwise somewhat serious nature of the main plot. For example, immediately after Bottom’s role is…
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