A Multiple Relationship Case Study Using Welfel’s Model for Ethical Decision-Making

1513 WordsAug 30, 20147 Pages
A Multiple Relationship Case Study Using Welfel’s Model for Ethical Decision-Making Abstract Many times in counseling sessions, situations arise that require the ability to make ethical decisions. When confronting these types of situations, counselors often refer to the Elizabeth Reynold Welfel’s Ethical Model, comprised of 10 steps, to guide them in making an ethical decision. These steps provide a framework which counselors may use to help with ethical dilemmas. Below are the 10 steps in the Ethical Decision-Making Model provided by Elizabeth Welfel in the book Ethics in Counseling and Psychotherapy to examine the multiple relationship case described in Herlihy and Corey’s ACA Ethical Standards Casebook (2006, p. 242) "A…show more content…
According to step 1, Phyllis appears to be sensitive to how her own personal principles, values, and worldview affect what is happening since she makes a mental note to discuss it with her with her doctoral supervision group, keeping Jena anonymous, in compliance with the Code of Ethics also. Regarding step 2, Phyllis has an ethical dilemma in that she wants to protect Jena from being labeled as “resistant to supervision”, yet at the same time, she wants to figure out a means of breaking through Jena’s resistance to supervision for Jena’s benefit. As to step 3, Phyllis has determined the nature of the dilemma is that Jena has become enmeshed with a client and is resistant to Phyllis’s advice. Phyllis is considering her options—ask her doctoral supervision group’s advice or consult with Dr. Walsh, the faculty member in charge of internships. However, she is fearful that doing so will make it more difficult for Jena to be accepted into the doctoral program. She winds up, at this point, giving Jena more time, which, in essence, is doing nothing (Herlihy and Corey, 2012, p. 243). Regarding step 4, while there are no laws which pertain to this particular case as it does not involve a sexual relationship, but there are regulations and professional standards one must adhere to. Step 4 and step 5 are closely related and are the crux of this ethical dilemma. Ethics codes of all major mental health associations mandate that therapists/supervisors

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