A New Year 's Resolution

1749 WordsDec 10, 20167 Pages
Goals are something unlimited that everyone should commonly set all throughout his or her life. In order to succeed, one needs to create a specific goal that seems sufficiently accomplishable. When something is unable to be accomplished, most people will give up and stop trying. This process of striving towards your aspirations and then suddenly quitting is eminently similar to a New Year’s Resolution. At the mark of every new year, people in our society wait until the 365th day of the year to realize what they want to achieve in life. Many will question all of their wrong doings and all of the little aspects of their lives that they feel need to be changed. New Year’s resolutions are meant for an individual to encourage growth and change from year to year. However, in reality, nobody ever sticks to their New Year’s resolution because what he or she wants to alter is either unrealistic, unchangeable, or they instantaneously given up on the resolution by the end of January. Society trusting a New Year’s resolution to determine how change is applicable to someone’s life is extremely inadequate. New Year’s resolutions ultimately enforce change among someone, that change is highly unlikely to actually be achievable due to the time span that one has to complete his or her resolution. People of all ages go month to month, possibly even week to week, looking for flaws or negative aspects in their life that they want to change. Most resolutions relate to losing weight, stopping
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