A Secret for Two by Quentin Reynolds

3985 WordsFeb 2, 201116 Pages
Mardari Tatiana Romanian-English, II group, third year A secret for two by Quentin Reynolds Text Analysis The text is included in belle-letters as it doesn’t follow a rigid structure, terminological lexemes or other norms imposed by functional styles. It belongs to emotive prose as the author uses the language of fiction and directs his work to the achievement of aesthetic and cognitive function. So, the narrative code is present here and the work itself is a short story: •Short - Can usually be read in one setting (it presents a general picture of Pierre Dupin’s life; some characters ― Pierre Dupin, horse Joseph, Jacques, episodic: president, driver, doctor; it has small proportions: about 1025 words); •Concise: Information offered in…show more content…
― link 1 Like all Large cities, it has small streets. Streets, for example, Like Prince Edward Street-only four blocks Long. ― link 2 Streets, for example, Like Prince Edward Street ― only four blocks Long. No one knew Prince Edward Street as well as Pierre Dupin. ― link 3 No one knew Prince Edward Street as well as Pierre Dupin. He had delivered milk to the families on the street for thirty years. ― link 4 Links 1- 4 connects the sentences of the fragment at the surface level, and the use of same lexemes (city, street, Prince Edward Street) insures the psychological side of coherence as it respects the connections between the concepts and idea (MontrealLarge city, Prince Edward Street-small street), between objects (Montreal-city-streetsPrince Edward Street-Pierre Dupin) and actions (He had delivered milk to the families on the street) reported. One can clearly imagine a concrete place and a man who works here. Cohesion comes to support coherence:    lexical chain: lexemes presenting place ― Montreal, city, streets, blocks; ellipsis: the omission of the verb ― Streets, for example, Like Prince Edward Street ― only four blocks Long to avoid repetition of has; Tense: Present Simple (is, has: narrator presents a general description, available to any time); Past Simple (knew) and Past Perfect (had delivered): places the events in the past as the narrator makes a retrospection of what is being told;  junctions: show comparison (simile: Like all Large

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