A Study on the Effectivity of the Philippine Prison System

10770 Words Nov 30th, 2011 44 Pages
A STUDY ON THE EFFECTIVITY OF THE PHILIPPINE PRISON SYSTEM
ABELARDO ELEANDRO

B. ALB IS, JR. F. 11ADRONA ALICE P. 11ARINO LEONIDES S. RESPICIO

To the builders of this nightmare Though you may never get to read these words I pity you; For the cruelty of your minds have designed the bel!; If men's buildings are a reflection of what they are, this one portraits tbe ugliness of all humanity. If you only had some compassion!
-grafitti written 011 the wall of American State Prison

I. INTROD UCTION

A system is said to be effective if the end is realized with a maximum of success while using a minimum of means. To test, therefore, the effectivity of the prison system, the end or the objective and the means or the strategy availed of to secure
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King Henry VIII thought it wise to pass severe laws to protect the "upright men" from such misfits. As a result two institutions developed to cope up with the problem. These were the jails or prisons chiefly used for the detention of those accused of crime pending their trials. The other were workhouses which were not penal institutions but were utilized solely to repress vagrant and paupers. The combination of these two institutions during the colonial period (18th Century) produced the modern prisons. This system was characterized by the establishment of reformation with cellular confinement and the use of hard labor as disciplinary and reformative measures. 3 Criminal Science also evolved during this period. One of the first breakthroughs in laying its foundation was Beccaria's book,4 of Crimes and Punishment. Beccaria believed that the only justification of legal confinement was the protection of society by prevention of crime and that the principle of uniform maximum severity was wrong and ineffective. Punishment must be proportionate to the crime and established by law. The view of Beccaria was adopted and implemented by the prison reformers that followed. One of them was John Harvard, reputed to be the greatest English prison reformer. He believed that prisons should be sanitary and secure, have separate cells and prisoners should have useful work in proper workshops with regular moral and