A Vision for Change: The Recovery Model and Irish Mental Health Services

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A Vision for Change details a comprehensive model of mental health service provision for Ireland. It describes a framework for building and fostering positive mental health across the entire community and for providing accessible, community based specialist services for people with mental illness (HSE, 2012). It focuses on a person-centred treatment approach, which looks at each element through an integrated care plan for service users, with special emphasis put on involving the service users, their families and carers at every level of treatment. Being involved in mental health services is more than the service user being diagnosed or attending consultation, they must be at the centre of the decision making. This is integral to recovery …show more content…
The next level - Mental health service level – highlights peer provided mental health services and placement on catchment management teams. Finally, the National Service User Executive - involvement in implementing and evaluating the new mental health policy.

Health services in Ireland developed in parallel with health services in Britain throughout the eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries - during most of the latter period, the Irish service developed its own direction. Until the 1960’s the activities of psychiatric nurses in Ireland were based in hospitals. The Department of Health (1966) issued a report ‘The Commission of Inquiry on Mental Illness’ where it was recommended that mental hospitals should be seen as centres of rehabilitation, with their aims of returning clients to the community - instead of being seen or used as centres of custodial care and as a result, causing those using the services to be institutionalized and unable to return back into the community. While some of these changed were implemented and service users were discharged into the community, the nature of mental health nursing care did not really change until the mid 1980’s, where changes were made in the United Kingdom almost a decade earlier. (Morrisey et al, 2008).

The recovery principle set out in A Vision for Change reflects a substantial shift