A critical analysis of Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

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The Dreary and Menacing Future of Technological Advancements Ray Bradbury 's novel, Fahrenheit 451, published in 1953, depicts a grim and also quite feasible prediction of a futuristic world. In Bradbury 's technology-obsessed society, a clear view of the horrific effects that a fixation for mindlessness would have on a civilization shows through his writing. Being carefree is encouraged while people who think "outside the box" are swiftly and effectively removed. The technology Bradbury 's society is designed to keep the people uninformed, which the vast majority of are happily and voluntarily in their ignorant state. There are many details in this novel that suggest that the future of a society obsessed with advanced technology is not…show more content…
The setting of Bradbury 's novel is at a time of war; bombs are dropped onto the society that once was home to Montag, "Perhaps the bombs were there, and the jets, ten miles, five miles, one mile up, for the merest instance, like a grain thrown over the heavens by a great sowing hand, and the bombs drifting with dreadful swiftness, yet sudden slowness, down upon the morning city they had left behind"(158). Undoubtedly, these bombs are a sinister and dangerous progression for technology. Bradbury 's society has many reasons to feel threatened by the advancements of its world. However, feeling threatened is impossible for a society that is founded on the principals of apathy. The people are carefree, which is encouraged by the government. How can a society with no worries rise up and rebel? The government obviously has the advantage of manipulation, which is carried out by their technology. Clarisse has an appropriate way of describing the bleakness of a society that doesn 't care, '"I sometimes think drivers don 't know what grass is, or flowers, because they never see them slowly," she said. "If you showed a driver a green blur, Oh yes! He 'd say, that 's grass! A pink blur! That 's a rose garden!" '(9). The uneasiness Clarisse feels for the way people behave in her time depicts how people do not take the time to enjoy the smaller parts of life because nobody in this society cares. Another machine that proves
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