A journey is the act of travelling from one place to another. Both Plath and Larkin portray this in

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A journey is the act of travelling from one place to another. Both Plath and Larkin portray this in a literal and metaphorical sense. I will analyse and compare ways in which Plath and Larkin portray their ideas about what a journey is to them. ‘Ariel’ and ‘Sheep in Fog’ by Plath portray the idea of a journey as a metaphorical escape as she struggles with her own insecurities and paranoia and contemplates death as the end to her journey. ‘Here’ and ‘Whitsun Weddings’ by Larkin portray a journey as an escape from the bustles of life and the oppressions of Capitalism in a consumerist environment to feel bliss in the solitude of his own thoughts. Plath’s journeys seem to have a metaphorical undertone; often the literal journeys she describes…show more content…
He believes that the passengers are simply slaves of consumerism and act much like sheep. Although they may think their life is unique, they are in fact all the same: a sentiment shared in Whitsun Weddings. For both poets, their journey is a form of escape but for different reasons, as we see that Plath "unpeels" from the "dead hands" of depression and Larkin "swerves" from "mortgaged", "raw estates" and "dead straight miles", representing his contempt for society as a whole. Plath’s form of travel in Ariel is via horseback which could be significant as horses are 'controlled' by the rider, linking to the desire Plath feels to regain control over her life. Since Plath enjoyed horse riding as a young girl, riding horses may have been one of the only ways Plath could truly feel at ease. Plath considers horse riding a release as she states “I am the arrow, the dew that flies”. Plath imagines herself as an arrow flying through the air. She feels like she is 'aimed' towards freedom and liberation, like an arrow aimed at a target. Describing herself as "the dew that flies" could also represent Plath's vulnerable emotional state; like a dew drop, delicate and pure. Travel via horseback could give a spiritual meaning to her poem as it causes the protagonist to become one with nature and therefore one with herself. Larkin's method of travel in Here is purposefully vague, much like the title, but we can tell that he uses a much more modern

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