AMBITION IN SCOTT FITZGERALD'S THE GREAT GATSBY AND WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S MACBETH

1677 WordsOct 26, 20087 Pages
Saad Amjad AMBITION IN SCOTT FITZGERALD'S THE GREAT GATSBY AND WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S MACBETH In the walk of life, ambition is the path to success; and persistence, the substance of ignition required to propel it. When harnessed with unmitigated precision, ambition is a force which can alone endow one with the jewels of life. However, if overmastered by ambition, it is not but a sign of doom and destruction, resulting ultimately in one's premature demise. In Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and William Shakespeare's Macbeth, many similarities and differences may be exhibited in the characters of the respective protagonists - Gatsby and Macbeth - through the recurring theme of ambition. Three pivotal facets found in both works of…show more content…
Another similarity found in the works of Scott Fitzgerald and William Shakespeare is that although the protagonist of each respective work appears to be self-assured and successful on the outside, internally, he in fact exhibits a dire weakness and vulnerability of character. In the first work, Gatsby's attainment of every possible worldly desire - but Daisy - leaves him with the feeling that despite having everything, he has got nothing. He continues to appear, however, as a man of wealth, status, and privilege. His opulent parties are host to the some of the wealthiest of America, and yet, they are nothing more than an elaborate theatrical presentation designed to portray a perception. Nick correctly points out that Gatsby himself is just "a mere observer of his own parties." While the guests use an outward show of opulence to hide their inner corruption and moral decay, Gatsby uses his parties in such a way as to erase his poor past and establish his wealth and status in the eyes of others, specifically Daisy. His spectacularly marvelous parties are not but a tool designed to force an impression of his wealth and superiority in the eyes of his lifelong love Daisy. Through Gatsby's lavish parties and outward show of opulence, it is evident that he feels insecure and apprehensive about his underprivileged past and tries constantly to curtain it

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