Act 3 scene 2 of A Midsummer Night's Dream

1212 WordsJun 23, 20185 Pages
Act 3 scene 2 of A Midsummer Night's Dream 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' is a comedy written by Shakespeare in the Elizabethan times, still performed in the present day. At Act 3 scene 2 we are probably at the height of confusion in the play. Each of the four lovers loves someone who does not love them. Demetrius loves Hermia, Hermia loves Lysander, Lysander loves Helena and Helena loves Demetrius. All this chaos is down to Puck, a mischievous fairy whose job is to stir up trouble to amuse the fairy King. Not only has he been distorting the lives of humans, but also the fairy Queen. She is momentarily in love with a mortal with an ass' head (also as a consequence of Puck's actions). The…show more content…
It furthermore makes the audience aware of exactly how much domination the fairies have over the humans. When Demetrius awakes he is in love with Helena, as is Lysander. This makes the situation again more confusing. As soon as he arises he remarks to Helena 'O Helen, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!'. This is exceedingly overwhelming and possible a little too much from Demetrius. This line also links back to Oberon's spell, where he says that Demetrius should see his lover as a goddess. He says her lips are like 'kissing cherries' giving an image or very deep red that would have been seen as very beautiful in the time when Shakespeare wrote this play. As would her skin, described as 'pure congealed white', a sign of great elegance and loveliness. We do not hear of Lysander's compliments, only of his defense against them. He says 'in their nativity appears all truth' yet this does not sway Helena from thinking that this is a prank simply to mock her. She says to both men, not only are they not content with being rivals to loving Hermia, but now they are 'both rivals, to mock Helena'. Helena sees herself as a 'poor maid' who is being taken advantage of
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