Acts Chart

1442 Words Dec 3rd, 2014 6 Pages
Directions: As you read pp. 122-145 in Norton, A People and A Nation, complete the chart below. Be sure to give lots of specific facts and details – people, places, literature, and events – that fully explain the actions taken.
PROVISIONS OF EACH BRITISH IMPERIAL POLICY
THE AMERICAN REACTION TO THE BRITISH POLICY
THE BRITISH REACTION TO THE AMERIAN REACTION
1. The Molasses Act (1733): This act placed a high tariff on molasses being imported by colonists from the French West Indies; it was passed in response to complaints by British West Indian planters that they were losing money.

American merchants responded to the act by bribing and smuggling their way around the law, actions that foreshadowed the impending imperial crisis. British
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Americans reacted very strongly to these taxes, and many riots broke out. Virginia began the riots when Patrick Henry introduced resolutions stating that Parliament had no legal authority to tax the colonies at all. Larger riots such as the Intercolonial Stamp Act Congress passed multiple series of resolutions in protest.
The British continued to enact the laws they passed because it was a good source of money that could be used to benefit the mother country. There were many riots and the British navy was used to help control the colonists and keep them in line.
PROVISIONS OF EACH BRITISH IMPERIAL POLICY
THE AMERICAN REACTION TO THE BRITISH POLICY
THE BRITISH REACTION TO THE AMERICAN REACTION

7. Declaratory Act (1766): an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain, which accompanied the repeal of the Stamp Act 1765. It stated that the British Parliament’s taxing authority was the same in America as in Great Britain

Americans were outraged because the Declaratory Act hinted that more acts would be coming. The colonists responded by protesting that Britain did not have the right to tax them.
They kept taxing the colonists and started saying that the colonists could do nothing about it.
8. Townshend Acts (1767): A series of measures introduced into the English Parliament by Chancellor of the Exchequer Charles Townshend in 1767, the Townshend Acts imposed duties on glass, lead, paints, paper

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