Addiction and Society

1653 Words Nov 18th, 2013 7 Pages
In our society we place high regard in individuals that are independently motivated and generally motivated towards purposes that are considered to be respectable within our society as contributing something. When individuals suffer from addiction deviate from this acceptable behavior they are often ostracized by society and in turn fall into a cycle where they are unable to better themselves not only because of their own addiction but because of the limiting view of an addict in our society. When addiction takes over an individuals being they become less capable of making decisions not related to finding or using a drug. Another aspect of this is the range of what addictive behaviors are considered acceptable in our society where it is …show more content…
What if the CEO was addicted to crack would the prostitute still be looked at as the “addict” and him the hard working individual? The answer would be probably not because he would be succumbing to an addiction that is socially considered worse than cigarette addictions. The level of addiction in our society is often viewed on a continuum rather than a black and white issue which we see in relation to almost all behaviors that are considered to fall into social behaviors.

The continuum of addictive behaviors and the range of social acceptability spans especially in the idea of gambling. In this idea of a spectrum we see the range from excessive gambling or problem gambling at one end where a person is considered by the majority of society to have a gambling addiction to someone who plays bingo on a weekly basis. Both these individuals would be gambling but one has taken it to the level where it is probably interfering with their ability to financially support themselves. This seems to be a defining factor in most aspects of the continuum the point at which an individual loses their control of supporting themselves. This seems to have an effect on social view of when a problematic behavior transitions to an addictive behavior. This is often because the responsibility for that person often shifts to society to assist them which in our western culture is an unacceptable outcome as we place
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