Adrian Barlow Writes of Susan Hill’s Strange Meeting: “at the Time of Its Publication, to Write a Novel About Intense Relationships Between Men in the First World War Was Considered an Ambitious Risk for a Woman Writer.”

1949 WordsMar 26, 20138 Pages
Adrian Barlow writes of Susan Hill’s Strange Meeting: “At the time of its publication, to write a novel about intense relationships between men in the First World War was considered an ambitious risk for a woman writer.” Compare and contrast the ways in which your three writers present relationships between men. 'One of the paradoxes of the War - one of the many - was that this most brutal of conflicts should set up a relationship between officers and men that was... domestic. Caring. As Layard would undoubtedly have said, maternal.' -Pat Barker: Birdsong Susan Hill’s Strange Meeting, published in 1971, Sebastian Faulks ‘Birdsong’, published in 1993 and Siegfried Sassoon’s poetry written during ‘The Great…show more content…
The most significant point of friendship and the break of social hierarchy are shown when Stephen allows Jack to call him by his first name while stuck in the tunnels “Shall I call you that?’... ‘If you want” (P451), this allows both characters to be at the same level with one another and shows that social hierarchies do not apply as they are both fighting the same war. (P137) “But he did for them both by his plan of attack.”: the single, end-stopped line at the end of the poem is dramatic, and is the pointed lesson of this poem: that the General and his staff are responsible for the death of the men. Similarly in ‘Strange Meeting’ Hilliard has some authority over Barton, as being an experienced solider he guides Barton through his journey to the war. Barton is inexperienced and doesn't know the things he will see will haunt him for the rest of his life. Hilliard feels protective over Barton that it is his duty to look after him. The effects of the war changes the characters friendship as they go through stages of not talking as due to Barton’s shock at war. The war definitely tests relationships but it also causes relationships to blossom. Throughout the second section of the novel both Jack and Stephen are intertwined. Each chapter starts with either Stephen or Jacks point of view. Faulks uses this narrative technique to ensure readers develop this parallel time frame into a

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