Adult Esl Student Motivation for Participation in Advanced Language Learning

6822 Words Mar 16th, 2011 28 Pages
Adult ESL Student Motivation for Participation in Advanced Language Learning

A. LANE IGOUDIN, M.A., PH.D.

Published in 2008 by The CATESOL Journal, 20 (1), 27-48.

ADULT ESL STUDENT MOTIVATION FOR PARTICIPATION IN ADVANCED LANGUAGE LEARNING

1

Abstract In recent years, TESOL has called for the study of the social and cognitive factors that affect adult English learners’ participation in formal language learning. This research project investigated the motivational processes of 10 adult immigrant English learners which led them to take an advanced ESL reading course. Using a mix of quantitative and qualitative strategies, the study found that the surveyed group of ESL students chose to engage in advanced language learning in
…show more content…
Readiness to learn which relates the timing of learning experiences to stages of human development 5. A problem-centered approach to learning with the immediate application of knowledge to real-life situations 6. Motivation to learn by internal factors (originated in the self), rather than external ones Kidd (1973) expanded the connection between adult learning and the concept of the self, stating “all new experiences for the [adult] learner are symbolized and organized into some relationship to the self, or ignored because there is no perceived relationship” (p. 127). Voluntary participation in education thus only happens when education itself is meaningful to the adult students’ sense of who they are and what they want to be.

ADULT ESL STUDENT MOTIVATION FOR PARTICIPATION IN ADVANCED LANGUAGE LEARNING

4

Kolb (1984) proposed a model of learning as a continuous cycle in which concrete experiences lead to their evaluation, conceptualization and the subsequent active experimentation. For example, a student’s experience of adjustment to a new social environment leads to the development of education goals and the subsequent participation in an organized learning activity. Learning as a psychological process happens in a multi-faceted interaction with the learner’s world. Set in a social context, adult learning is not an acquisition, or receptive process but also one of externalization. Jarvis (1987) and
Open Document