Advancement And Recommendations For Fingerprinting

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Criminalistics: Advancement and Recommendations for Fingerprinting Table of Contents Criminalistics: An Introduction 2 Fingerprinting: History and Background 2 Fingerprints- What and How 4 The Society and Fingerprinting 6 Problems-Ethical and Legal 7 Recommendations 7 Conclusions………………………………………………………………………….................... 8 Bibliography..………………………………………………………………………................... 9 List of Figures Figure 1. In ancient China, thumb prints were found on clay seals………………………. 3 Figure 2. Friction ridges on a finger……………………………………………………...... 4 Figure 3. The three different fingerprint patterns- arch, loop and whorl……………….. 5 Figure 4. Taking latent fingerprints using powder dusting………………………………. 6 In today’s modern scientific…show more content…
328). It is a rapidly developing field of science with ever-changing techniques. As Jeffrey Deaver, a mystery and crime writer says, “Criminalistics doesn’t exist in a vacuum. The more you know about your environment, the better you can apply it (Deaver, 1997).” Fingerprinting: History and Background The use of fingerprints and handprint patterns as a means of personal identification dates back to thousands of years. There were archaeological records of the usage of these by the Chinese dating back to 2000 years ago (Stuart James, 2014, p. 331). As a matter of fact, in Babylon and ancient China, fingerprints were routinely pressed into clay tablets (Figure 1). It is thought that this was done for purposes of authenticating or perhaps just out of superstition (Farelo, 2009). However, Sir William Herschel, a British administrator is credited for being the first European to recognize the value of fingerprinting as a means of personal identification. When he was working for the Civil Service of India, he entered into a contract with a local businessman and asked him to put his right hand print on the back of the contract (Stuart James, 2014, p. 331). Apparently, in that part of the country, traces of bodily impressions were considered more binding than signatures (Saferstein, 2011, p. 4). Figure 1. In ancient China,
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