Advantages And Disadvantages Of Presidentialism

1679 Words7 Pages
1. Introduction Since the Third Wave of Democratization, numerous developing countries have undergone democratization. However, it has been a controversial topic on which constitutional framework, i.e. Presidentialism or Parliamentarism, would serve better in bringing political stability to these new democracies. While there’s no doubt in my mind that Parliamentarism would be a better choice for them, I believe that it needs to be operated under several necessary conditions. I will explain about my rationale in the following paragraphs. 2. Definition of political stability Firstly, ‘frequency of ‘social unrest’, which can be demonstrated by activities such as ‘civil strife, political violence and protests’ (Qassem, 2009), would be used as…show more content…
the president, is chosen directly through popular votes, rather than among the legislators, there’s a separation of power between the president and its cabinet, i.e. the executive branch, and the legislative branch. Both branches are independent of each other and do not have the power to control another branch. Also, Presidents are elected to stay in office for a fixed period, that they can’t be removed until they finish their term of office-although impeachment system exists in many Presidential democracies, it can only be used under extreme circumstances, like that when the president commits a crime, so that an impeachment is very…show more content…
It is because under Presidentialism, a candidate may win the poll even if only a minority of voters pick them as their ideal choice (Canello, 2012). That is even more likely in the new democracies in developing countries, where there tends to have numerous major candidates in the election due to the existence of multi-party and lack of coordination between parties with similar background and ideologies, unlike the U.S., that has a two-party system with two well-organized parties including the Democrats and the Republicans, that are the political affiliations’ of nearly all the Americans. For example, the first Egypt president Mohamed Morsi only won less than a one-fourth of the votes in the first round of the election in 2012 (Lynch and Stanglin, 2013). On the other hand, in Parliamentarism, as the Prime Minister is either the leader of the majority party or coalition in the parliament, he is more likely to be accepted by a majority proportion of the
Open Document