Advertising Has Targeted Women for Decades

1888 WordsAug 13, 20098 Pages
1 Research Proposal From television commercials to radio to print ads, advertising has defined the meaning of perfection. Most notably, advertising dictates what to eat, what to wear, where to go and who to be seen with. At the same time that childhood obesity is at an all time high, women in our society are facing advertising 's idealized portrayal of unrealistic bodies. Anorexia nervosa, bulimia and a multitude of other self inflicted diseases are running rampant in societies nationwide. Our group was intrigued by the relationship between women and advertising. College aged women often find themselves as the target of many advertisements. At a time when women are told to define themselves and mature, advertisers recognize their…show more content…
But exactly how much do advertisements affect the way women feel about themselves and the way they live their lives through dieting, clothing choices, exercise, etc? Previous studies show that viewing thin models increases weight-related anxiety to an extent that women internalize the thin ideal, and that this anxiety is heightened with the duration of the viewing time (Brown/Dittmar, 2005). In an experiment done by Brown and Dittmar, 75 women were exposed to either neutral advertisements (no models) or to thin models, at either low or high attention, manipulated by the exposure time and focus instructions. This article aimed to extend the understanding of why women come to feel bad about their own bodies after exposure to thin models. Since we are studying how advertisements affect women’s body image and perception of themselves, this article will be a great reference since it shows the correlation between media exposure that contain ultra-thin ideals to increased bodydissatisfaction and eating disorders. Since many studies have shown that ultra-thin models have an effect on women, we plan to investigate how these advertisements affect women after planting an unrealistic expectation of perfection into their heads. 1 Another study we found focuses on the younger range for the target audience of eighteen to twenty year olds is a
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