Afro-Latinos in NYC

1406 WordsMay 1, 20146 Pages
Afro-Latino in New York City Growing up in New York City is a very unique experience. You grow up surrounded by a diverse population of people packed tightly into one city. But with this kind of diversity come the questions of self-identification and how others view you. I was born and raised in the upper Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights which is known for its mostly Dominican population. Moreover, growing up in the public school system and everyday New York living has exposed me to many different Latino and Black communities and culture. I have experienced racism; I have experienced the implementation of hegemonic ideals and I have been exposed to poverty. Even after all the civil rights movements and activism that have…show more content…
This has always made me debate race because in the eyes of others race is skin color, hair, eyes. Race is what people see and becomes less and less about what your background is. Living in New York City you would think people would be more open-minded. Recently, I was walking into a downtown nightclub with about four other Spanish females when we over hear a, I’m assuming, White female telling the security we just walked passed “How dare you let in these minorities before me?!” It was just a reminder that even though we’ve progressed in terms of racial equality there still exists an ignorant population. Another link that I find interesting among the Afro-Latino communities of New York City is that racially discriminated races are pushed into poverty. Philippe Bourgois writes about New York City during the crack epidemic of the 1980s. He explains through cultural reproduction theory that although it may seem that inner-city residents appeared to live in a community astray from the mainstream ideals they actually held similar values such as the drive to achieve the “American dream.” He describes the inner-city as a culture of resistance that intends to accomplish its goal of success through the refusal of being stepped on by the “white man.” The form of upward mobility that this culture seeks is usually achieved by

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