Air Pressure Of A Soccer Ball

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The original question was, “What is the effect of air pressure of a soccer ball on its bounce, ramp travel, and catapult travel?” The hypothesis stated that if a soccer ball is inflated to 5 different air pressures (namely 6.9 kPa, 31 kPa, 55.2 kPa, 79.3 kPa, and 103.4 kPa), then the soccer ball that is inflated to 103.4 kPa (15 PSI) will perform the best in all three tests: namely the bounce, ramp, and catapult travel tests. According to Soccer Ball World, higher air pressure correlates to further travel. This is due to that fact that higher pressure improves the rebound of the soccer ball off of a player’s foot, and less energy is lost to deformation on a stiffer ball. However, after experimentation, the ball that was inflated to 55.2 kPa…show more content…
The factors at play during the catapult test were the most complicated out of all three tests. One of these factors was projectile motion. Projectile Motion is motion under the influence of gravity and is represented by the equation h(t) = –4.9t2 + v0t + h0, where v is equal to the initial velocity of the object and h is equal to the initial height of the object. The initial height of the object should have been the same because the soccer ball was released by pulling 91 cm (3 ft) back and 61 cm (2 ft) down. This means that the velocity had to change for the results to have any variation. Newton’s Second Law applies to this test as well. The greater the mass of the ball, the more force it will require to achieve the same velocity as the balls that weigh less than it. So, the balls with lower pressures should have performed better. However, potential energy also applies here. PE=mgh. The acceleration due to gravity and the height were the same, but the mass changed. With a decrease in mass comes a decrease in potential energy. So, the potential energy would have been greater with balls of a higher pressure. Kinetic energy also came into play in the catapult test, but it was balanced. KE=…show more content…
During the bounce test, the ball may have been released from different points. Although it was supposed to be released from its bottom, human error may have compromised the precision of this measurement. To improve the design of the bounce test, the ball’s bottom point should be marked, and the ball should always be released from there. During the ramp test, the ball may also have been released from different points. Although the ball was supposed to be placed on the ramp so that it would be released from the front, human error may also have compromised the precision of this measurement. In addition, human error may have caused unintentional and unnecessary force applied to the ball. To solve these design issues, a door should be made that holds the ball at a certain position for a fixed amount of time before the experimenter released the ball. During the catapult test, the ball may have been held back for an excessive amount of time. To resolve this experimental design issue, a fixed time to hold the ball back should be
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