Alarm Fatigue: A Concept Analysis

2650 Words Oct 9th, 2015 11 Pages
Alarm Fatigue in Health Care: A Concept Analysis
Chamberlain College of Nursing
NR-501: Theoretical Basis for Advanced Nursing Practice

Alarm Fatigue in Health Care: A Concept Analysis
Alarm fatigue in health care has grown to be an ever-growing concern in the health care arena, especially when looking at patient safety concerns. There must be an understanding of the problem before we can develop policies and effective strategies to counter this problem. The concept of alarm fatigue in health care will be evaluated utilizing the method developed by Walker and Avant (2010) that identifies and gives the significance of the attributes, antecedents, and end-consequences of alarm fatigue in health care. This will be developed based
…show more content…
This ultimately results in safer outcomes for patients.
USES OF THE CONCEPT
Walker & Avant (2010) state the next step in the analysis of alarm fatigue is identifying the uses of the concept in literary sources. To gain a better understanding of how the term alarm fatigue was developed, definitions from Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary (2015) were obtained. There was also research performed, looking at nursing and health care research regarding the term alarm fatigue, as I found there was a plethorah of information available regarding patient safety and hospital noise levels.
Dictionary Definitions According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary(2015), alarm is defined as “a device that makes a sound to create a warning about something” (Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 2015). The Macmillan dictionary defines alarm as “the fear or worry that something unpleasant or dangerous might happen” (Macmillan Publishers, 2015). Stedman’s concise medical dictionary for the health professions (2001) further defines alarm as “a device to help people to be aware of an unwanted occurrence or event by signal” (Stedman & Dirckx, 2001). The Merriam-Webster online dictionary (2015) defines fatigue as “a state of being very tired” (Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 2015). Stedman’s concise medical dictionary for the health professions (2001) further defines
Open Document