Albert Camus and Bohemian Rhapsody Comparison

1695 Words Dec 9th, 2013 7 Pages
Combining the writings of “Queen” and Albert Camus Albert Camus was one of the most renowned authors during the early twentieth century. With writings such as The Stranger, and The Plague, Camus has struck the world of literature with amazing works that are analyzed to a great extent. This amazing success was not just handed to Camus on a silver platter however; Albert endured many hard times and was often encumbered with great illness in his short life. These hardships that Camus had to face, emphasized in his writings and literature. Camus’ work is very closely related to songs written and sung by a band named Queen. Queen’s song, “Bohemian Rhapsody”, is one of few songs, that correlate to Albert Camus views on the Absurd, which …show more content…
Freedom; In a world devoid of external significance and meaning, man is free to create his own happiness. The loss of external values is also liberation from our dependence on them. The man speaking in Bohemian Rhapsody talks about feeling liberated and free after he has left “real life”. Passion; Recognizing and living with the absurd entail a passionate consciousness of each moment of experience. What we lose in quality of experience derived from external values we gain in quantity of consciousness and passion derived from our awareness and rejection of the absurd. The existentialism of Albert Camus is based on his view of life as the Absurd. This sense of the Absurd derives from the realization that man is destined to die, as if being punished for a crime he never committed. There is no reprieve, and this makes life absurd (Peyre). There is no God in Camus’s conception, and those who hope for an afterlife are thus to be disappointed. Camus understood that the fact that there is no God also means that there is no meaning or purpose to life outside of living life to the fullest, and that there is a destined end. The one saving grace in the world seems to be the fact that while there is no God on which man can depend, man can live as if he can depend on his fellow man, even though he and they will all die (Sprintzen). This is another absurdity, but it is based on the fact that the
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