Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There: For Adults Only!

"'Curiouser and curiouser!'cried Alice" (Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland 9). At the time she was speaking of the fact that her body seemed to be growing to immense proportions before her very eyes; however, she could instead have been speaking about the entire nature of Lewis Carroll's classic works Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There. At first glance, the novels seem easy enough to understand. They are simple children's stories filled with fantastical language and wonderful worlds. They follow the basic genre of nearly all children's work, they are written in
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He played with them, relaxed with them, and became young again by their acquaintance. Perhaps most importantly though, he told them stories. On July 4, 1862, he told them the story that inspired a classic, the story of "Alice's Adventures Under Ground." This was a story he had been working on in one way or another for nearly twenty years, but required little Alice's intervention to write. While many events in the first manifestation of the story inspired by the Liddells remain in the work we read today, months of planning and research moved the book "away from parochial allusions and mere child's play toward more advanced and reasoned ingenuity" (Hudson 266). The story expanded from a recanting of friendly outings to a tale of deep symbolism, psychology, and generational satire.

Each character in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its companion piece Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There symbolizes something beyond a deck of cards, a storybook character, or a figure of popular rhymes. We will begin with Alice herself. Alice is something more than Carroll's hero. "She is the free and independent mind" (Empson 262). Alice symbolizes Carroll's view of women. She was the queen to a man who had from "early youth . . . sought the society of little girls . . . compensating himself in part from his inability to form friendships with women of
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