“All segments of the literary world—whether establishment, progressive, Black, female, or

1200 WordsApr 23, 20195 Pages
“All segments of the literary world—whether establishment, progressive, Black, female, or lesbian—do not know, or at least act as if they do not know, that Black women writers and Black lesbian writers exist.” During the 1970’s to 1980’s, African American studies of Black’s steep legacy was a dying trade. Alice walker stepped up in this time period as an influential writer of the recovery movement for African American studies. Three well respected works from Alice Walker are: The Color Purple, The Third Life of Grange Copeland, and Meridian. We will focus on Walker’s narrative, The Color Purple which details the story of a young eight year old girl named Celie who was sexually abused by her stepfather. Celie seeks help through her…show more content…
Her problems show that she is trying to convey the physical deformity she faced throughout her life and what the deformity did to her personality. Her incident allowed her to attend Spelman College in Atlanta on a scholarship for the handicapped. During her college years, she decided to join the Civil Rights Movement and participate in political activities. Much of her experience was made into her novel Meridian. After college in 1967, she married a civil rights lawyer named Melvyn Leventhal, and continued her civil rights work in Jackson, Mississippi, where she wrote her first novel, The Third Life of Grange Copeland. By 1977, she divorced her husband and accepted a job as an Associate English professor at Yale University. She had written six books and a book of poems before moving to San Francisco in 1978. The characters in her third novel The Color Purple, couldn’t be written in her urban setting, as a result, she moved to a nearby farm and therefore helped remind her of her hometown in rural Georgia. Walker also used her success to help other female writers. She advocated for classes in women’s literature and helped promote the works of neglected female and black writers. Alice Walker found much of her inspiration through other authors such as South African novelist Bessie Head and black Chicago poet Gwendolyn Brooks. These authors influenced her style of writing along with what she depicted within her stories. Bessie Head addressed the

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