Allelopathy and the Alliaria Petiolata Essay

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Introduction The term ‘allelopathy’ was introduced in early 1937 by Molisch when he discovered that there existed both detrimental and beneficial biological interactions among all plants and microorganism (Rivzi 1). His discovery aided Rice in coming up with a more clear definition of allelopathy. According to Rice, allelopathy is any effect (beneficial or harmful) by one plant or microorganism on another via excretion of chemical compounds to the environment (Rivzi 1). Since then, many researches have been carried out to determine the beneficial and detrimental impacts of allelopathy on agricultural practices. For instance, Bellard, McCarthy and Meekins studied on genetic variation as well as biogeography of Alliaria petiolata in North…show more content…
Introduction The term ‘allelopathy’ was introduced in early 1937 by Molisch when he discovered that there existed both detrimental and beneficial biological interactions among all plants and microorganism (Rivzi 1). His discovery aided Rice in coming up with a more clear definition of allelopathy. According to Rice, allelopathy is any effect (beneficial or harmful) by one plant or microorganism on another via excretion of chemical compounds to the environment (Rivzi 1). Since then, many researches have been carried out to determine the beneficial and detrimental impacts of allelopathy on agricultural practices. For instance, Bellard, McCarthy and Meekins studied on genetic variation as well as biogeography of Alliaria petiolata in North America in 1st January 2001. According to their findings, Alliaria petiolata varied in not only phenology, but also morphology across all the native plants in which it grew ( Bellard, McCarthy and Meekins 161). They also found out that Alliaria petiolata also varied in terms of seed dormancy. In their results, they also stipulate that Alliaria petiolata is a hexaploid plant species based on n=7. In tandem to Bellard, McCarthy and Meekins findings, Hanson and McCarthy also claim that Alliaria petiolata is one of the plant species that have contributed to the loss of many indigenous plants in North America. They assert that Alliaria petiolata is a non-indigenous plant species that belongs to Brassicaceae family (Hanson and McCarthy 68).
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