Allusions In The Tempest

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Allusion Allusion is a brief and indirect reference to a person, place, thing or idea of historical, cultural, literary or political significance. Often the reference is well known and can sometimes give further insight on certain meanings and display greater context. Example 1: Marlowe’s “Doctor Faustus” Act III: “Learnèd Faustus, to find the secrets of astronomy Graven in the book of Jove’s high firmament, Did mount him up to scale Olympus’ top,” Jove’s high firmament in this passage refers to the vast stretches of the universe. “Olympus’ top” is an allusion to Greek Mythology where Mount Olympus is the home of gods. Example 2: Milton’s “Paradise Lost”, Book 6: “All night the dread less Angel unpursu’d Through Heav’ns wide Champain held…show more content…
The author parodies Shakespeare’s play from post-colonial point of view. Cesaire also changes the occupations and races of his characters. For example, he transforms the occupation of Prospero, who was a magician, and changes him into a slave-owner, and also changes Ariel in Mulatto, though he was a spirit. Cesaire, like Rhys, makes use of a famous work of literature, and put a spin on it in order to express the themes of power, slavery and colonialism. Juxtaposition Juxtaposition is a literary technique in which two or more ideas, places, characters and their actions are placed side by side in a narrative or a poem for the purpose of developing comparisons and contrasts. Example 1: Dylan Thomas’ poem “Do not Go Gentle into that Good Night”: “Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light. And you, my father, there on the sad height, Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray. Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the…show more content…
It is a metonymy because the word “ears” replaces the concept of attention. Example 2: “Out, Out” by Robert Frost. “As he swung toward them holding up the hand Half in appeal, but half as if to keep The life from spilling” In these lines, the expression “The life from spilling” is a metonymy that refers to spilling of blood. It develops a link between life and blood. The loss of too much blood means loss of life. Ode Ode is a literary technique that is lyrical in nature, but not very lengthy. You have often read odes in which poets praise people, natural scenes, and abstract ideas. Example 1: Ode to the West Wind by Percy Bysshe Shelley “Scatter, as from an unextinguish’d hearth Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind! Be through my lips to unawaken’d earth The trumpet of a prophecy! O Wind, If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?” This presents an example of irregular ode that employs neither three parts, nor four line stanzas like a Horatian ode. Nevertheless, each stanza of ode is distinct from the other stanzas in rhyme scheme, pattern and length. Example 2: “Ode to the Confederate Dead” by Allen
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