Amelia Earharts Impact on Womens Rights During the Great Depression

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Amelia Earhart has resonated in our society, ever since her death, but she was also a very prominent figure during the Great Depression.
Earhart was a very independent woman, and prided herself on this. Born on July 24th, 1897, from a very young age she embraced a sense of experimentation and physical freedom , which led to her success in woman’s rights later in her life. As a child Earhart described, “It has always seemed to me that boys and girls are educated very differently.” When Earhart got married to George Putnam she was very clear with him that “even though they were to be bound by marriage, she was still an individual woman with her own rights.” She even went as far as to say on her wedding day that she would “not hold [her
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Amelia Earhart has resonated in our society, ever since her death, but she was also a very prominent figure during the Great Depression.
Earhart was a very independent woman, and prided herself on this. Born on July 24th, 1897, from a very young age she embraced a sense of experimentation and physical freedom , which led to her success in woman’s rights later in her life. As a child Earhart described, “It has always seemed to me that boys and girls are educated very differently.” When Earhart got married to George Putnam she was very clear with him that “even though they were to be bound by marriage, she was still an individual woman with her own rights.” She even went as far as to say on her wedding day that she would “not hold [her husband, George Putnam] to any medieval code of faithfulness to me nor shall I consider myself to bound to you similarly.” She also would never take up her Putnam’s name in order to remain an independent woman; in fact her Putnam was often called Mr. Earhart. As well as having an independent outlook on life, Earhart was very optimistic, and believed that if women proved worthy in aviation, and in all aspects of modern life, prejudices would fade and barriers would fall. “Many people say that her individualistic movement can be boiled down to two points: first, that women can achieve whatever they set out to do, and second, that it should be the ability of the individual, not the sex that counts.” As Earhart entered the business of
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