Amendments Essay 8

2136 WordsDec 24, 20069 Pages
Amendments Main article: List of amendments to the United States Constitution The Constitution has a total of 27 amendments. The first ten, collectively known as the Bill of Rights, were ratified simultaneously. The following seventeen were ratified separately. [edit] The Bill of Rights (1–10) United States Bill of Rights currently housed in the National Archives Main article: United States Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights comprises the first ten amendments to the Constitution. Those amendments were adopted between 1789 and 1791, and all relate to limiting the power of the federal government. They were added in response to criticisms of the Constitution by the state ratification conventions and by prominent individuals such as Thomas…show more content…
The only existing case law regarding this amendment is a lower court decision in the case of Engblom v. Carey. [4] "No soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law." [edit] Fourth Amendment Main article: Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution The Fourth Amendment guards against searches, arrests, and seizures of property without a specific warrant or a "probable cause" to believe a crime has been committed. A general right to privacy has been inferred from this amendment and others by the Supreme Court (See Griswold v. Connecticut), including a right to abortion (Roe v. Wade). "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." [edit] Fifth Amendment Main article: Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution The fifth forbids trial for a major crime except after indictment by a grand jury; prohibits repeated trials for the same offense after an acquittal (except in certain very limited circumstances); forbids punishment without due process of law; and provides that an accused person may not be compelled to
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