America: Diverse in Nature, Belief and Ideology

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Concerning America today, many people have a set of "cardboard cut-out" traits that they tack onto American citizens, and what it means to be an American. These traits are typically very broad, and simplistic, and in many cases, are relics of the 50's. The truth, however, is quite different. Although some people try to attach universal traits to Americans, citizens of this country are very diverse in nature, belief, and ideology. I've identified four characteristics most commonly associated with being an "American". First, he believes in the American dream, owning a home and achieving happiness through material goods. Second, he is patriotic, supporting his country through wars and turmoil. Third, he believes in freedom, and that America…show more content…
Is it just the privilege to use bank 1 or bank 2? Or is right to speak your word no matter what it may contain? The average American uses his freedom of choice, and recognizes his freedom of speech and sovereignty, and attaches them to what makes him an American. In this painting, a single man is shown standing valiantly speaking, what is inferred to be, his beliefs, and all those around him are listening intently. This painting is a great example of what freedom of speech is perceived to be. In reality, recent politics have been tainting the meaning of the word. It has been bent, molded, and forged into a sword with which to cut through dissent and protest, their argument vindicated with that word, whose pure history has been blemished. In an article from "Freedom Daily", it is said, "Bush freedom meant 'free speech zones' where demonstrators were quarantined," "Bush freedom meant allowing the National Security Agency to vacuum up Americans’ email without a warrant," and "Bush freedom meant entitling the Justice Department to round up the names of book buyers and library users under the USA PATRIOT Act (Bovard)." According to Bovard, our freedoms have been choked and restrained, in the name of- freedom? Yet we're all still American, aren't we? Voting is a citizen's right, privilege, and responsibility. As Americans, are we obligated to vote? Some would say that, "with freedom comes obligation, with liberty comes duty," and some would
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