America During The Spanish American War

1916 Words Mar 20th, 2016 8 Pages
America practiced the tradition of isolationism when it came to its foreign policy for 110 years. The foundation for isolationism is typically given credit to George Washington in his farewell speech when he states, “The great rule of conduct for us, in regard to foreign nations, is in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible” America continued the policy of isolationism or non-interventionism up until the Spanish-American war. This is the first time in American history where significant foreign intervention is seen taking place. The Spanish-American war was brought on by Cuba struggling to gain independence from Spain. U.S newspapers used propaganda to lead citizen’s sentiments to side with Cuba. Spain had been portrayed as brutal and repressive against the Cuban rebels with their use of concentration camps and such. American opinion of Spain was already low, and this further enhanced that opinion. To make matters worse, a letter written by Spanish Minister Enrique Dupuy de Lome that spoke of President McKinley in an unfavorable way was published in U.S Newspapers. These events swayed public opinion of Spain in a very bad direction. On February 15th, 1898, the U.S.S Maine was blown up in the Havana Harbor killing over 200 men. Though it was never determined what actually caused the sinking of the ship, blame was placed on the Spanish. Newspapers used stories and drawing to enrage the American public even…
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