American Imperialism In The 19th Century

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For the later part of the nineteenth century most of the world was ruled over by an imperial power. Imperialism is defined by _______ as “the militarist and expansionist tendencies characterizing the advanced industrialized countries at the end of the nineteen century” (cite). Countries that fell under this definition included Britain, Japan, and later on the United States, all industrializing countries with a rich history of conquest and a unique take on imperialism. All of these countries have on thing in common, their imperial history and the driving force behind it, nationalism. Though nationalism is mainly behind imperialism it can be seen that each imperial power’s nationalism has evolved over the years. By looking at these countries…show more content…
From there the English continued to expand up the coast in order to advance commercially. During this the English were also able to set up trading posts in India through the East India Company (Woodward 1902i). Throughout the next century the American colony flourished into the most successful colony. With the help of the American colony, the British gained much of Canada and were also able to take full control of French India (Cain and Hopkins 2002a). Though after this period the American colony would not be as helpful anymore. The American colony fought for independence starting in 1775 and ended up gaining their freedom from Britain (Woodward 1902j). This however did not phase the advancement and growth of the empire. By the nineteenth century the British Empire had reached its peak. It had expanded over continents and was competing against many of the other global powers of the time for colonies and resources (Cain and Hopkins 2002b). From Oceania to Africa to the Americas, the British Empire had reached it all at this point in their history. By the end of the First World War it was clear that Britain could no longer keep up with its ever-growing empire. Colonies kept uprising, the war had been very costly, and they were not strong enough to keep up with people far away. During the period in between the World Wars countries were given back or granted independence and the British Empire was at its end (Cain and…show more content…
For much of its history Japan was a “closed country” and only opened up to very few people, those being the Dutch and on occasion their Chinese neighbors (Hayes 2012a). It was not until 1853 that Japan would have its first visitors, the United States (Hayes 2012b). Commodore Matthew Perry would force open Japan’s ports and have them agree to “unfair treaties” (Hayes 2012c). This led to the overthrow of the last shogunate’s rule in 1868 and the eventual emergence of Japan’s imperial empire. In 1868, the Meiji Restoration was well under way. During this time period the Japanese were looking to western powers for industrializing and reorganizing the way their government and even society operates (Hayes 2012d). Japan took it upon itself to emulate the western powers in order to discover its role in the international sphere (Hayes 2012e). As the country expanded and western influence grew Japan looked to expand their empire and saw Korea. Until the 1880s Japan began to assert policy against Korea, this led to conflict with China until 1895 in the Sino Japanese War (Hayes 2012f). The defeat of the Chinese resulted in the annexation of Korea to the Japanese as well as Taiwan and Liaodong Peninsula (Hayes 2012g). This also left a target on the Chinese’s back for many years. Japan now had control over a vast majority of East Asia by the time World War I came around. In order to compete
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