An Affair to Remember

2181 Words Jan 25th, 2018 9 Pages
The cinema was a tad unclean; some of the seats were soiled and the screen curtain was torn in places. These faded red and ripped curtains parted before Sebastian K. Day’s eyes, as if he were Moses, and they were the Red Sea. When the screen was fully exposed, the film began. The screen flickered the way old films of this time tend to do so, but when one is watching a first-rate film – so-called “reality” hastily retracts its claws and retreats. One’s self is focused upon the unfolding cinematic experience. The radio tower on top of the world spoke to us in Morse-code. The action of the film cuts between the slow, repressed amble of a suave, sophisticated gentleman, around a railway station, with one those refined and genteel accents that appears in films of this time, and a woman frantically running through the foggy streets in pursuit of an unattainable goal – her, societally forbidden lover, the gentleman in the restroom. He drains his cup of tea, as the voice of the Noël Cowardesque announcer called out down the platform “The train for -, - and – is now arriving at Platform 3.” He, the gentleman, hearing this announcement, which after all was intended for his ears, and his alone, drains his cup again (an obvious, but, due to the high emotive tension of the film, often overlooked continuity error), grabs his mackintosh and fedora and…

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