An Essay on A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

878 Words 4 Pages
After reading from the excerpts of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman I have concluded that the situations of women, as far as rights are concerned, have indeed improved vastly. However, even though their situation has been amended and they are now afforded the same equal rights as men, not all women take advantage of these rights. A fraction of women still care more about their own physical beauty, appearance, and the prospect of finding a husband than anything else. Furthermore even, some of the more juvenile women will even occasionally go so far as to play dumb, thinking to attract the affection of men; while others get so self-obsessed with their appearance that they don’t even have to act in order to be received as dim witted or …show more content…
After reading from the excerpts of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman I have concluded that the situations of women, as far as rights are concerned, have indeed improved vastly. However, even though their situation has been amended and they are now afforded the same equal rights as men, not all women take advantage of these rights. A fraction of women still care more about their own physical beauty, appearance, and the prospect of finding a husband than anything else. Furthermore even, some of the more juvenile women will even occasionally go so far as to play dumb, thinking to attract the affection of men; while others get so self-obsessed with their appearance that they don’t even have to act in order to be received as dim witted or ditsy, and it is this minority of women who continue to hinder the role of women in society as a whole. Nonetheless, this does not mean that most women have not taken advantage of these rights, establishing themselves as equals to men within schools, at work, and in the home.
In comparison to 1792, in which A Vindication of the Rights of Woman was written by Mary Wollstonecroft, women’s rights have vastly improved. In the time of Wollstonecroft, women were unwittingly oppressed by men for years through lack of education and operant conditioning that taught them to be nothing more than attractive, elegant, and essentially the subordinates of men; making independent thoughts or the use of personal reason a scarce occasion among the women of the
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