An Ethical Dilemma: Affirmative Action, Do We Still Need It?

1706 WordsJul 26, 20097 Pages
Running head: An Ethical Dilemma: Affirmative Action, Do We Still Need It? An Ethical Dilemma: Affirmative Action, Do We Still Need It? Abstract This paper discusses the importance of affirmative action in today’s society and the ethical role it plays when Employers and Universities are considering entry to their respected places of establishment. The paper will conclude with what America will face in the future in terms of affirmative action. An Ethical Dilemma: Affirmative Action, Do We Still Need It? Affirmative action still headlines stories in the media. Some in the minority groups agree that affirmative action has assisted them in so many ways, while others totally disagree with the policy altogether. The people…show more content…
The employer’s race, gender, or attitude could possibly dictate the one who would get hired for the job. “Many employers race and sex, as well as racial attitudes, are potentially important influences affecting the hiring process.” (Button and Rienzo, 2003, p.3) For example, prior to affirmative action, if one did not have the right color or gender, he or she did not get hired for the job. Employers felt they should hire one of their same race or gender. For years there has been a racial divide in America. The constitution reads, “All men are created equal.” For years minorities have been looked at as lower class citizens. In the early days of America, minorities did not have the same status of those in the majority. Affirmative action affords the opportunity minorities need in order to get ahead in society. Affirmative action opens up the opportunity for minorities that was not made available to them 50 years ago. Affirmative action plays an important part in getting employment with certain higher learning institutions. According to Cahn (1993): Affirmative action is not an integral part of the appointment process at virtually every college and university in the United States. Announcements of available faculty and administrative positions routinely include statements such as this actual one: “[The University] is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer which actively seeks and encourages nominations of, and expressions of interest
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