An Expert Who Fostered The Immature Criminal Investigation System Of The 1920s London

1048 Words Apr 7th, 2016 5 Pages
Have you ever remarked, appreciated, or even begrudged someone who seemed to be endowed with the perfection in manipulating logic and the rare possession of eidetic memory? The probability of me receiving a solid “no” would likely emerge. Admittedly, it is rather difficult to encounter gifted people with astonishing talents, even in many renowned institutes and colleges. However, exceptions do exist in literature, and amongst the noble characters stands the detective Sherlock Holmes, an expert who fostered the immature criminal investigation system of the 1880s London. His outstanding skills in deduction and observation, along with his famous, eidetic memory, have been the most popular topics amongst readers since the publication of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet. Since then, the character’s publications and dramas held predominant places in entertainment industries and impressed people of all countries. One thing that distinguishes Sherlock Holmes from mundane Scotland Yard officers is his insightful means to resolve cases—deduction. Deduction has been the efficacious shot of antibiotics straightly transported to the nub of complication throughout the stories. Starting with the illustrious quote Sherlock said to his loyal colleague Watson, “I see it, I deduce it” (Doyle, p.2), the detective tended to look through the eyes of criminals and use logic to formulate rational ratiocinations. This unique style of investigation was…

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